3D Print Demo Design

This is a set of stl models used to teach students about the design possibilities and limitations of 3D printed objects. Print both objects without support to teach about orientation, bridging, bed adhesion, and overhangs.

3D printer parts and enhancements

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1.
Print the first file.  While printing
intro the basics of 3D printing XYZ motors, Extruder, Hot End, Filament.



2. The print will probably fail at some point. Try to
let it go as long as possible without damaging your printer/making a mess.



3. When finished, stop the print and have students
examine what happened - what parts turned out like the original model? What
parts look different? Why did it happen? Develop a list of recommendations for
3D print design.



4. Print the second model, I like to have students
watch and showcase some 3D printed doodads/ designs.



5. The second design should print no problem. When
finished have the class examine - how did a different model orientation effect
the print quality? What parts look different? Why did it happen? Revise the
class list of recommendations for 3D print design. If a student doesn't mention
it - I always like to highlight the sloped base of the T, it is possible to
print things that extend outward can be printed but the slope should not exceed
70 degrees to be safe.

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Comments

Mini shop photoCameron Watt published this design ago